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What in the world does Balayage, Ombré or Babylights even mean?

For those of us that are not color professionals, fear not! Here are a few definitions that will help you understand some of the popular color services offered in salons today. It’s all about technique and the finished end result you desire. Having a consultation with your colorist prior to any color ever touching your head is absolutely essential. Photos always help but knowing some lingo will go a long way as well!

Balayage – is a technique

Balayage is a French word meaning to sweep or to paint. It allows for a sun-kissed natural looking hair colour – similar to what nature gives us as children – with softer, less noticeable regrowth lines. The principal idea being less is more when creating soft, natural looks.

Ombré – is a style

The hair world borrowed the term ‘Ombre‘ from the french word meaning shaded or shading. Ombre hair color is generally darker at the roots through the mid-shaft and then gradually gets lighter from the mid-shaft to the ends.

Babylights – is a style

Babylights are delicate highlights created using a very fine hair color technique to mimic the subtle, dimensional hair color seen on children’s hair. “My clients often bring in photos of their children for inspiration, asking me to make their color look that fresh and natural.

Hair Melting – is a technique

Melting is a technique that blends the highlights with the base color of the hair so you don’t have any harsh lines,” Matrix StyleLink stylist George Papanikolas told BuzzFeed. “The difference between this and regular highlights is that you use multiple shades to create the ‘melted‘ effect.”

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/beauty/hair/g3027/hair-color-trends-2016/?  Here is a link so some more fall styles you may enjoy checking out this season but remember what works for someone else may not work for you and vice versa. Make sure you use a trusted color professional – no good color ever comes out of a box! 🙂

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